The art of the perfect fit

Review: Magali Reus at the South London Gallery

Posted by D.R.A.W in Featured · June 2018

The first major solo exhibition of London-based Dutch artist, Magali Reus - As Mist, Description – was one of very fine detail in sculptural form.

The first major solo exhibition of London-based Dutch artist, Magali Reus – As Mist, Description – was one of very fine detail in sculptural form. Great, meticulous care taken in the making seemed to carry the seeds of an internal anachronism (we think that artisanal care is a thing of the past, not normally applied to contemporary structures/machinery such as these, which were made using elaborate casting and moulding techniques).

Reus is certainly an accomplished maker/artist so it’s a superb show from the ‘making’ point of view, but fails to communicate much, whether intentionally ambiguous or not, visitors didn’t seem to engage with the works or spend more than a few seconds in front of each.

This is a recent (2017) body of work by the Dutch artist, each piece is well spaced out from the others, and devised as if it was seen ‘in progress’ – either mid-activity or abandoned after usage. Vaguely reminiscent of Helen Marten’s work, which equally tends to create sculptural works which draw your gaze in using the power of endless details found in mainly recognisable objects, whose function has been annulled or altered.

We feel the words used by the Guardian’s Chief Culture Writer Charlotte Higgins to describe Marten’s work (in 2016) could be applied to this show: “If you submit yourself to this art – approaching the sculptures like free verse whose meaning you might rather absorb than decode – you realise you are in a place unlike any you’ve entered before, where a distinctive mind has messed with the world of objects and meaning, creating her own strange, compressed archaeology, which you are invited to expand into imaginary life.”

This abstraction ends up taking you to another dimension, but one we feel quite devoid of emotions.

             

Notes from DRAW · 02.06.2018

Read More

Working in the Arts: Nick Hall

This week for our ongoing Working in the Arts profile, we talk to Nick Hall who is Director – Head of Fine Art at Henry Adam’s Fine Art Auctioneers in Chichester, West Sussex. So, where do you work? I work at Henry Adams Fine Art Auctioneers in Chichester, West Sussex, as well as a BBC…

Spotlight on: Venice, Italy

With the Venice Biennale now in full swing we are shining a spotlight on Venice this month. This 60th anniversary edition, this year curated by Adriano Pedrosa is titled Foreigners Everywhere and is a must see for art lovers far and wide. The historic tourist destination is brimming with…

Working in the Arts: Sarah Arnett Ordaz

Continuing our focus on the US, for this week’s Working in the Arts segment we spoke with Sarah Arnett Ordaz who is the Gallery Manager at Lisson, New York. So, where do you work? I work at Lisson Gallery, in our New York office. What is your job title? Gallery Manager – though this title…

Unlocking Success: The Numerous Benefits of Utilising Temporary Workers in the…

In today’s dynamic and fast-paced business environment, our clients are constantly seeking innovative ways to stay agile, efficient, and competitive. One workforce strategy that has gained significant traction in the art world is the use of temporary workers. Whether it’s seasonal…