The art of the perfect fit

Should Employers Advertise a Fixed Salary on a Job Advert?

Posted by Emma Restall in News · October 2021

There has been a lot of discussion around this topic and so we thought we would add to the wider conservation. Advertising a fixed salary on job advert may sound like a no brainer, but it doesn’t always make sense. So, what should you do?

If the role being hired for is within a museum/ public institution, or, an organisation with fixed salary bands, then it makes perfect sense to advertise the salary upfront. Likewise, in a business where the salary must remain within a range to fit in with peers and company structure. Stating the salary upfront will prevent any wasted time from both the client and candidate’s perspective.

As a middle ground many employers will set out a salary range, but there is a downside to that as well: a candidate may feel deflated if, after the interviews and suitability assessment, you offer them a salary at the lower end of the range.

It is often the case that employers don’t advertise the salary at all, especially in small and medium-sized enterprises which many of our clients within the arts fall into. Employers will often set about their searches with quite an open mind and a willingness to be flexible on the job and the salary depending on the skills and experience that candidates can bring to the business and the level of responsibility they may be capable of assuming. By leaving the salary out of the advert employers can consider a wider pool of applicants and will often adapt the role to fit. This can be a useful approach in areas of labour shortage.

This applies to the UK Market and we would be interested to hear both client and candidate thoughts on this matter.

 

Notes from DRAW · 15.10.2021

Read More

Working in the Arts – Art Tech Special: Rebecca Davison-Mora

Rebecca Davison-Mora is the Communications Manager at Arcarta, a due diligence platform that supports the art market. Previously she worked in various leadership roles at arts institutions and commercial galleries in Toronto, Canada. She holds a Master’s degree in Arts and Cultural Management…

Working in the Arts – Art Tech Special: Nick Walter

This week for working in the arts we spoke to Nick Walter, CEO of Vortic Art. Vortic is a powerful virtual reality and digital exhibition ecosystem for galleries, institutions and collectors to quickly and sustainably curate, share, and revisit exceptional exhibitions with any viewer, anywhere in…

Working in the Arts – Art Tech Special: Tanya Van Sant

For the next few weeks we are focusing our Working in the Arts segment on the intersection between art and technology. To kick things off we chatted to Tanya Van Sant, Vice President of Personnel at Artlogic. Since 1994, Artlogic has been building technology to improve the art world. With complete…

Working in the Arts: Bridget Rambeau

This month’s Working in the Arts segment is US focussed as we chat to Bridget Rambeau who works at Hauser & Wirth in LA. So, where do you work? Hauser & Wirth, at the Los Angeles gallery. And what is your job title? Registrar What time did you wake up and what are you usual working…